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Posts Tagged ‘reading’

What To Read Locally


The first thing I wanted to do when refreshing this blog was to look at what reading I could find for local issues. My head has been firmly stuck in a narrow realm of the Library would (Digital Preservation) and I think I should get back to looking more widely if I am going to blog more regularly here.

For local reading we have a few resources.

LIANZA produces a monthly newsletter called LibraryLife. They also, in conjunction with the School of Information Management from Victoria University of Wellington, help publish the New Zealand Library Information Management Journal. Both contain good example’s of library reading.

Victoria University also makes available online the various research papers from the students who study library science. There are three collection, the Masters of Information Systems, The Masters of Information Management and the Masters of Library ans Information Science.

What we don’t do well, which I think is a shame, is publish papers presented at the Library conferences over the years.

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So my activity in this space has not proven to be very diligent in recent times. In 2014 I intend to change this.

One of the things I am looking to do is to prepare to apply for admission into a Master of Arts with Thesis. As part of this process I need to to do some reading and research. My intention is to reflect on that reading and research here as I go. This will act as a form of note taking but also might allow you gentle readers to give me pointers if you see something that might be of interest.

So the general form of the project at hand.

In my day job I am currently writing a Digital Preservation document and at the same time dealing with a platform (the NZETC a legacy Digital Humanities resource from before Digital Humanities was trendy) which is coming to the end of it’s viable life in it’s current form. By the end of the year the intention is to have transformed the NZETC into a newer and more robust platform.

This has raised my interest in the planning around resources like the NZETC. My rough idea for the MA is to do research into what planning has gone into the end life and life cycle of Digital Humanities projects/resources/platforms. My initial idea is that I will need to identify a number of such projects, contact the administrators and survey them around their plans.

I need to read even more around digital preservation, life cycle management, web site management, digital humanities research.

As the year goes and the research firms up in form I will post updates and also what I have been reading.

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Reading and Writing


“Nearly universal literacy is a defining characteristic of today’s modern civilization; nearly universal authorship will shape tomorrow’s.”

We as librarians are more often than not concerned about how people are reading, and how do we facilitate that reading. Sometimes it might be a good plan to look at how writing is evolving to give us clues as to how people will be reading 🙂 .

Here is a link to a New York Times blog on the revolution in writing. The comments are quite interesting.

And here is a link the original article the Times was linking to. See below for the start.

“Nearly everyone reads. Soon, nearly everyone will publish. Before 1455, books were handwritten, and it took a scribe a year to produce a Bible. Today, it takes only a minute to send a tweet or update a blog. Rates of authorship are increasing by historic orders of magnitude. Nearly universal authorship, like universal literacy before it, stands to reshape society by hastening the flow of information and making individuals more influential.”

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