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Posts Tagged ‘digitisation’


This is a way cool. It’s my happy work win of the week 🙂

There are many advantages to the digitisation of important collections. One such advantage is the acquisition of new materials. That’s not something that often occurs to folks as they plan the digitisation  projects.

We have had just one such example with Heels. Heels is the magazine of the Victoria University of Wellington Tramping Club. We thought it started in 1968 and we digitised our complete run: http://nzetc.victoria.ac.nz/tm/scholarly/tei-corpus-heels.html.

Well it turned out we were wrong. A colleague had been in communication with a member of the Victoria University of Wellington Tramping Club and it turns out he had earlier editions of Heels. Putting the word out to other members of the club it looks like we will be getting one physical copy of a issue we don’t currently hold and digital copies of around 6 other issues we don’t hold. In fact since the emails started flowing yesterday I already have two digital copies of issues in my inbox!

This is made of win.

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One of the activities my team at Victoria University Library recently has been carrying out is  the digitisation of the Robert Stout Pamphlet Collection.  We have been steadily working through uploading them into the NZETC and now nearly forty volumes are available. If you want to spend some time heading down a rabbit hole then have a browse.

An example of the eclectic mix of Pamphlets in the collection

An example of the eclectic mix of Pamphlets in the collection

The Pamphlet Collection of Sir Robert Stout

This project aims to digitise the Sir Robert Stout Pamphlet collection currently held by the J. C. Beaglehole Room. The Stout Pamphlet collection contains around 1000 early primarily New Zealand pamphlets collected by Stout and donated to the Victoria University Library. The pamphlets were then bound into their present volumes.

The collection represents Stout’s interests at the time which included evolution, land reform, law and the temperance movement.

To complement the pamphlet collection we have digitised K. A. Coleridge‘s catalogue with indexes. This catalogue contains valuable information on the history of the collection, the process of binding the collection and Stout’s relationship with the Victoria University library. You can find the catalogue here.

Some notable ones I have read:

Is Man An Automaton? A Lecture Delivered in The City Hall, Glasgow, On 23rd February 1875

Science and the Soul Telepathy Scientifically Demonstrated

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I thought I’d share this post with you. Its from Dick Eastman, an extremely tech-savvy genealogist. 

He responds to an email from someone who is horrified that alot of the books in the FamilySearch Family History Library are being digitised so they can be put online, and the original hard copies aren’t being replaced on their shelves. 

This Library/Research Centre is “Mecca” for someone in my field (along with The Fred J. Reynolds Historical Genealogy Department in Allen County Public Library.)

For those who don’t know, FamilySearch is the genealogical organisation owned and run by the Church of the Latter Day Saints. Although they have their own reasons to do with their faith for genealogical research, they offer their resources/services worldwide free, to anyone regardless of their beliefs.

In their Granite Mountain vaults, they have millions of microfilms that are being digitised so they can be put online on their free website, and their books and serials in the FamilySearch Family History Centre are also being microfilmed so they can be OCRed. They are said to be running the world’s biggest digitisation project.

Anyway, have a read of this post and see what you think, and how it may relate to us as librarians (or researchers) in the future:

http://bit.ly/OULrqU

As a researcher, I am excited about the possibility of being able to access such richness online. As a librarian, I have subdued mixed feelings about the “destruction of books”, even if it is for the “greater good”. I’m sure they have a preservation process for their most precious titles.

I thought the points discussed were thought provoking and not dissimilar to discussions we’ve all had – you might be interested in his opinions about the digital versus “real” books debates that we are hearing and participating in!

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