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Rebloging with update

The Room of Infinite Diligence

So the National Library has announced a fundamental change to its Services to Schools and it’s a terrible idea. The National Library is transforming its Services to Schools

Why is it a terrible idea? I’m glad you asked.

First up let’s look at what they are planning

Reading Engagement Lending Service

The emphasis of the new service will be on supporting students to read for pleasure, as a foundation for learning achievement. The content of loans will be quality fiction and high interest non-fiction resources to support reading for pleasure.

We’ll be supporting the whole school with a substantial loan that everyone can access, and you can keep the resources for a year. Loans will also no longer go to individual teachers and librarians.

So instead of sending teachers the books they need, they are going to send the school a whole lot of random books. Who at the school…

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So the National Library has announced a fundamental change to its Services to Schools and it’s a terrible idea. The National Library is transforming its Services to Schools

Why is it a terrible idea? I’m glad you asked.

First up let’s look at what they are planning

Reading Engagement Lending Service

The emphasis of the new service will be on supporting students to read for pleasure, as a foundation for learning achievement. The content of loans will be quality fiction and high interest non-fiction resources to support reading for pleasure.

We’ll be supporting the whole school with a substantial loan that everyone can access, and you can keep the resources for a year. Loans will also no longer go to individual teachers and librarians.

So instead of sending teachers the books they need, they are going to send the school a whole lot of random books. Who at the school is going to monitor and store these books?  Poor school librarians who already HAVE LIBRARIES FILLED WITH QUALITY FICTION AND HIGH INTEREST NON-FICTION RESOURCES! Libraries that are already faced with pressures to their shelving?

So no longer will a teacher be able to say “I need a class set of resources that help me look at beaches” which a school library can’t resource. Nope – instead they are going to try and supplant the work of the School libraries that already exists.

UPDATE:

After a large outcry the National Library has pushed back the timeline on the changes

However the substance of the changes remain – which in effect prolongs the assault on school libraries and can only impact negatively on student outcomes.

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So in the last few days I have had some conversations about the reuse of tweets, whether it is ethical to quote them, have you published when tweeting and generally around the whole concept of privacy and ethics.  I have had a few thoughts which I am going to share. Feel free to leap in and let me know where you think I have got it wrong.  O, and I am putting this on my writers’ blog The Worlds of Michael J Parry and my library blog The Room of Infinite Diligence because of many intersections.

The first question I considered is: “Is tweeting publishing”. The OED first defines publishing as “To make public”, or in fuller “To make public or generally known; to declare or report openly or publicly; to announce; (also) to propagate or disseminate (a creed or system). In later use sometimes passing into sense.” Which makes sense to me although from that you could say the act of speaking is publishing.

To me the act of publishing is when you take a thought, which up until that moment is privately held within your mind, and you then express it in some way that makes the thought more permanent and transmittable to others by some form of media.

By this definition, and by my way of thinking, then yes Tweeting is a form of publication.

So then the questions become even more complex. What rights do you as the originator of the tweet have other how the tweet is used? What responsibilities do the reader and potential re-user of the tweet have to you as the content creator?

For me it comes down, as it often does, to context. Do you have an expectation of privacy around your tweet? If you are tweeting from a locked account yes. You control who can see and read it. If you have a public account I don’t see how you can. A public account is by its nature, public.

To my mind, if you publicly tweet something, you are publishing it and giving it to the world for free to read and then potentially reuse. We implicitly agree to this through using the service and through our acceptance of such functionality as the ability to re-tweet.

Does the reader have any responsibility or special ethical considerations for the re-use of your tweet? Should a journalist say ask you permission before quoting? I would say if you have publicly tweeted then no.  They have no ethical considerations beyond the usual they should have when preparing a story.

But what about copyright? Fair use? Is a tweet a work, or a part of a work? Especially if it is published! This is a bit of a grey area for me.  It seems to me there is an implicit release of copyright in the act of tweeting. Especially in a public feed.

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If there is one lesson that I have “learnt” as an adult is that it is okay to ask for help. Yet that can be real hard, especially when the area you need help in is linked to your profession. Who want’s to admit that you struggle with something that is fairly important to your professional identity?

For me  this is framing search requests. It’s not something I have to do since I don’t work in the reference side of librarianship, but still, I don’t really like to admit that when it comes to working out effective search strategies I struggle.  This is doubly so when I want to do my own research.

One of the “things” I want to do this year is to do preparatory reading around a topic that I want to turn into a Master of Arts by thesis. I started earlier but my inability to find good reading material has caused me to let that slide. And so I am asking for guidance. Can any of you kind folks help me with developing search strategies?

The topic I am reading about is: What thought’s/planning around digital preservation, life cycle management, has gone into developing digital humanities web sites and resources. I am interested in finding research that discusses whether in the development stage of a project like the NZETC any thought was given to how long it should be maintained, how it would be preserved, what sort of development should be ongoing?

So far I have found oodles of research around digital preservation but nothing applicable to what I am looking for. It may be there is nothing out there but I am worried my searching is at fault.

My searches so far have encompassed “digital preservation” “Life Cycle Management” “Digital Humanities” “Digital projects” “website” “planning

 

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So my activity in this space has not proven to be very diligent in recent times. In 2014 I intend to change this.

One of the things I am looking to do is to prepare to apply for admission into a Master of Arts with Thesis. As part of this process I need to to do some reading and research. My intention is to reflect on that reading and research here as I go. This will act as a form of note taking but also might allow you gentle readers to give me pointers if you see something that might be of interest.

So the general form of the project at hand.

In my day job I am currently writing a Digital Preservation document and at the same time dealing with a platform (the NZETC a legacy Digital Humanities resource from before Digital Humanities was trendy) which is coming to the end of it’s viable life in it’s current form. By the end of the year the intention is to have transformed the NZETC into a newer and more robust platform.

This has raised my interest in the planning around resources like the NZETC. My rough idea for the MA is to do research into what planning has gone into the end life and life cycle of Digital Humanities projects/resources/platforms. My initial idea is that I will need to identify a number of such projects, contact the administrators and survey them around their plans.

I need to read even more around digital preservation, life cycle management, web site management, digital humanities research.

As the year goes and the research firms up in form I will post updates and also what I have been reading.

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Together, Sally Pewhairangi and Megan Ingle are Heroes Mingle! If that looks a little superhero-ish, well, that’s because I think they are. They are doing some excellent work collaborating with each other to facilitate their own professional development.

“Heroes Mingle is our collaborative name. It tells a story about two librarians who do more than dream big. Two librarians who want more from the profession than just turning up to work to do a good job. Two librarians who, just like many other heroic characters aren’t going to wait for someone else to solve our problems; who have the guts to say yes, take a leap of faith; and make something happen.”

Recently they gave a presentation ‘Creating the professional development opportunities you want’ at the Worldwide Virtual Library Conference 2.013. They’re also writing about it. Part one is by Sally, Part two is by Megan.

I watched them do this work from the sides (on Twitter) and was impressed at the momentum they created (facilitated?) in the people who were participating. It’s heartening to remember that there are people doing good work for the future of librarians in New Zealand.

Ngā mihi nui ki a kōrua.

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LIANZA13 Day 2 reflection


This is my reflection on Day 2 of LIANZA 13. It includes some of the specifics of the day and was originally published in two slightly different formats on my personal blog.

I ended the day dazzled by the bombardment of awesome from Eli Neiburger,  from Ann Arbor. His main points were about diversification of the library role – collections, production, and customer experience. He did this by using examples that illustrated what his library had been doing. The activites were exciting and inspiring, but it was the way they were thinking about the value of their services for their communites that I found the most exciting.  (On a smaller (more achieveable?) scale, Matt is writing about the activities he’s been doing in Parkes in the Finding Library Futures series. Same philosophy – to steal a phrase from Matt – “that imaginative play is also the business of libraries.“)

There’s a real theme emerging about Playfulness.

It started in the presentation by Penny Hagen about using design frameworks to have a conversation with the community about their library – particularly useful for a new building or a refurbishment. She talked about using tangible objects – models of the library, paper cutouts etc – to start the conversation. From this another couple of themes are emerging – Just Start and Prototype/Test. (I’ve been testing the origami fortune teller for the redesign of orientation at my kura. I’ve made about four versions so far and each time I learn something new. I don’t get the same insights from the notes I write before I fold the paper.)

The themes of Context and Collaboration are also continuing through the presentations. I enjoyed the links that people made during their presentations with the effect that the research/initiatives/changes/actions had on their communities.  It made their examples more concrete and made it easier for me to transfer some of that thinking to my situation. It feels like more sophisticated thinking than ‘how to do this thing’ or ‘how I did this thing’. That practical work is also important, but the examples about the difference it makes speaks to the Library’s purpose. I’m calling it next layer thinking – we’re getting beyond the objects/basic service and starting to dream and think about what could be done next. This was particularly evident for me in Tim Sherratt‘s presentation on the work Trove is doing to connect heritage collections with users. Their success is shown by the fact that users are spontaneously creating their own ways of sharing the things they find in the collection via #TroveTuesday and other ways. (Ravelry is apparently a great place for people to share the patterns they’ve found on Trove.) We’re articulating value for the community rather than financial return or stuff based things. It’s fucking exciting.

Two practical things for me –

1. An idea that was inspired by Eli’s presentation is for APNK to expand into MakerSpaces in smaller towns. MakerSpaces (according to Eli) are extensions of what already happens at the library – photocopy, print, access to creation software. It feels like a great fit for APNK with their mission of “everyone can benefit from accessing, experiencing and creating digital content.”

2. Thanks to Anne Ferrier-Watson I have a further idea of how to discuss the change of library service in the kura. It’s an issue for the whole institution to discuss. I can start the discussion by asking questions like – How does scholarly research fit into the learning/teaching philosophy of the kura? What sort of resource weaving do students need to be able to do – in their written work, in their tangible work, in their collaborative group work? I think these will be great questions to focus the discussion away from access and collections and into a more literacy focused area.

All my notes for Day 2 are available in this document. (If you’re at conference and have things to add, please do so!)

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