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Michael J. Parry:

Rebloging with update

Originally posted on The Room of Infinite Diligence:

So the National Library has announced a fundamental change to its Services to Schools and it’s a terrible idea. The National Library is transforming its Services to Schools

Why is it a terrible idea? I’m glad you asked.

First up let’s look at what they are planning

Reading Engagement Lending Service

The emphasis of the new service will be on supporting students to read for pleasure, as a foundation for learning achievement. The content of loans will be quality fiction and high interest non-fiction resources to support reading for pleasure.

We’ll be supporting the whole school with a substantial loan that everyone can access, and you can keep the resources for a year. Loans will also no longer go to individual teachers and librarians.

So instead of sending teachers the books they need, they are going to send the school a whole lot of random books. Who at the school…

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So I did a presentation at NDF on Digital Preservation.

It’s now available on Youtube. Probably like most folks I only managed to watch the first little bit. :-)


So the National Library has announced a fundamental change to its Services to Schools and it’s a terrible idea. The National Library is transforming its Services to Schools

Why is it a terrible idea? I’m glad you asked.

First up let’s look at what they are planning

Reading Engagement Lending Service

The emphasis of the new service will be on supporting students to read for pleasure, as a foundation for learning achievement. The content of loans will be quality fiction and high interest non-fiction resources to support reading for pleasure.

We’ll be supporting the whole school with a substantial loan that everyone can access, and you can keep the resources for a year. Loans will also no longer go to individual teachers and librarians.

So instead of sending teachers the books they need, they are going to send the school a whole lot of random books. Who at the school is going to monitor and store these books?  Poor school librarians who already HAVE LIBRARIES FILLED WITH QUALITY FICTION AND HIGH INTEREST NON-FICTION RESOURCES! Libraries that are already faced with pressures to their shelving?

So no longer will a teacher be able to say “I need a class set of resources that help me look at beaches” which a school library can’t resource. Nope – instead they are going to try and supplant the work of the School libraries that already exists.

UPDATE:

After a large outcry the National Library has pushed back the timeline on the changes

However the substance of the changes remain – which in effect prolongs the assault on school libraries and can only impact negatively on student outcomes.


One News ran a story on Technology forcing libraries to transform. It features Upper Hutt, and Auckland Council libraries.

The more things change, the more they stay the same. ;)


So in the last few days I have had some conversations about the reuse of tweets, whether it is ethical to quote them, have you published when tweeting and generally around the whole concept of privacy and ethics.  I have had a few thoughts which I am going to share. Feel free to leap in and let me know where you think I have got it wrong.  O, and I am putting this on my writers’ blog The Worlds of Michael J Parry and my library blog The Room of Infinite Diligence because of many intersections.

The first question I considered is: “Is tweeting publishing”. The OED first defines publishing as “To make public”, or in fuller “To make public or generally known; to declare or report openly or publicly; to announce; (also) to propagate or disseminate (a creed or system). In later use sometimes passing into sense.” Which makes sense to me although from that you could say the act of speaking is publishing.

To me the act of publishing is when you take a thought, which up until that moment is privately held within your mind, and you then express it in some way that makes the thought more permanent and transmittable to others by some form of media.

By this definition, and by my way of thinking, then yes Tweeting is a form of publication.

So then the questions become even more complex. What rights do you as the originator of the tweet have other how the tweet is used? What responsibilities do the reader and potential re-user of the tweet have to you as the content creator?

For me it comes down, as it often does, to context. Do you have an expectation of privacy around your tweet? If you are tweeting from a locked account yes. You control who can see and read it. If you have a public account I don’t see how you can. A public account is by its nature, public.

To my mind, if you publicly tweet something, you are publishing it and giving it to the world for free to read and then potentially reuse. We implicitly agree to this through using the service and through our acceptance of such functionality as the ability to re-tweet.

Does the reader have any responsibility or special ethical considerations for the re-use of your tweet? Should a journalist say ask you permission before quoting? I would say if you have publicly tweeted then no.  They have no ethical considerations beyond the usual they should have when preparing a story.

But what about copyright? Fair use? Is a tweet a work, or a part of a work? Especially if it is published! This is a bit of a grey area for me.  It seems to me there is an implicit release of copyright in the act of tweeting. Especially in a public feed.


If there is one lesson that I have “learnt” as an adult is that it is okay to ask for help. Yet that can be real hard, especially when the area you need help in is linked to your profession. Who want’s to admit that you struggle with something that is fairly important to your professional identity?

For me  this is framing search requests. It’s not something I have to do since I don’t work in the reference side of librarianship, but still, I don’t really like to admit that when it comes to working out effective search strategies I struggle.  This is doubly so when I want to do my own research.

One of the “things” I want to do this year is to do preparatory reading around a topic that I want to turn into a Master of Arts by thesis. I started earlier but my inability to find good reading material has caused me to let that slide. And so I am asking for guidance. Can any of you kind folks help me with developing search strategies?

The topic I am reading about is: What thought’s/planning around digital preservation, life cycle management, has gone into developing digital humanities web sites and resources. I am interested in finding research that discusses whether in the development stage of a project like the NZETC any thought was given to how long it should be maintained, how it would be preserved, what sort of development should be ongoing?

So far I have found oodles of research around digital preservation but nothing applicable to what I am looking for. It may be there is nothing out there but I am worried my searching is at fault.

My searches so far have encompassed “digital preservation” “Life Cycle Management” “Digital Humanities” “Digital projects” “website” “planning

 


 Sci-Fi and Squeam is an Australian podcast that “brings the Queer geek listener and friends all the things happening in the geeksverse, from topics in Horror and Sci-Fi, comics and video games and fan culture, to interviews and reviews“.  A couple of weeks ago they included an interview with Dr Matt Finch about his work with libraries around immersive play.

Matt is one of the keynote speakers at VALA14 this week. Here are some of my favourite quotes from the interview…

The idea is to do something beyond interaction with the screen, where you’re actually physically in this location, and you get to determine the outcome of the story in the way that the writer or the designer maybe didn’t predict. Taking down the boundary between the audience and the storyteller and making them work together to find a satisfying conclusion.

…Every neighbourhood has this magic building and its sole job is to give you access to all human knowledge and culture – it doesn’t matter if you’re rich or you’re poor or you’re young or you’re old or where you’re from, that’s what it’s there for. For you to step into whatever world the human race has thought of or described or dreamt of.

…actually the point is that you have these publically funded people who are guides to everything the human race has ever thought of or dreamt up.

Listen to Dr Matt’s dulcet tones (interview starts around 26:50] or read the transcript after the jump.

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